Vox Asks: Is it Time We Started Adding Lithium to Water Supply?

Left-wing media outlet Vox is questioning whether the U.S. should start adding lithium to the public’s water supply.

In an article entitled “How our drinking water could help prevent suicide,” Vox highlights psychiatry professor Nassir Ghaemi and his claims that the practice would be beneficial for the American populace.

“High-lithium areas, he says, have suicide rates 50 to 60 percent lower than those of low-lithium areas,” Vox writes, citing a study co-authored by Ghaemi.

“In general, in the United States, lithium levels are much higher in the Northeast and East Coast and very low in the Mountain West,” Ghaemi said. “And suicide rates track that exactly — much lower suicide rates in the Northeast, and the highest rates of suicide are in the Mountain West.”

The article goes on to state that lithium advocates allege “tens of thousands of lives a year” could be saved with “small amounts of lithium, amounts likely too small to have significant side effects.”

Comparing such a move to “the way we put fluoride in to protect our teeth,” Vox adds, however, that countless studies prove lithium to not be effective whatsoever.

Vox argues that mass-drugging the U.S. citizenry, if alleged to be effective by scientists, should be done anyway.

“At the very least, I’d love for some governments to conduct real, bona fide experiments on lithium,” the article states.

Such a policy, Vox continues, would be ethically sound so long as the practice is deemed to be more good than bad.

“There are serious ethical questions about doing experiments like this that affect whole populations, but if lithium’s effect is real and we don’t pursue it because we lack compelling enough evidence, thereby endangering thousands of people — that’s an ethical problem too,” the article adds.

Vox even describes adding lithium to the water as a beneficial “mind-control plot.”

“The rap against fluoride, mocked in movies like Dr. Strangelove, is that it’s a mind-control plot. But putting lithium in the water would actually be a mind-control plot: It would be a concerted effort by the government to put mind-altering chemicals in the water supply to change the behavior of the citizenry,” Vox writes. “And I say that as someone who thinks that, if it works, that it would be a great idea!”

Listen to a 2010 interview between Alex Jones and board certified neurosurgeon Dr. Russell Blaylock on the dangers of lithium below:

FOLLOW THE LINK FOR THE FULL REPORT – JR

https://www.infowars.com/vox-asks-is-it-time-we-started-adding-lithium-to-water-supply/

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YouTube Adding ‘Fact Checks’ to Videos that Question ‘Climate Change’

And so it begins: YouTube is now adding “fact checks” to videos which question the man-made global warming scare narrative.

According to Buzzfeed News:

YouTube is now adding fact checks to videos that question climate change, BuzzFeed News has confirmed, as a part of its ongoing effort to combat the rampant misinformation and conspiratorial fodder on its platform.
On July 9, the company added a blurb of text underneath some videos about climate change, which provided a scientifically accurate explainer. The text comes from the Wikipedia entry for global warming and states that “multiple lines of scientific evidence show that the climate system is warming.”

https://www.real.video/embed/5820238527001

This new feature follows YouTube’s announcement in March that it would place descriptions from Wikipedia and Encyclopedia Britannica next to videos on topics that spur conspiracy theories, such as the moon landing and the Oklahoma City bombing. In doing the same for climate videos, the company seems to be wading into more fraught and complex intellectual territory.

Sure, in many ways it’s a trivial and pathetic gesture. Quoting Wikipedia as your credible source is a bit like citing CNN as the go-to site for all the latest info on Donald Trump. And anyway, that “scientifically accurate explainer” is at best vague, at worst far more misleading than the videos it is supposed to be “fact checking.”

It says:

“Global warming, also referred to as climate change is the observed century-scale rise in the average temperature of the Earth’s climate system and its related effects. Multiple lines of scientific evidence show that the climate system is warming.”

So the records show that there has been some gentle warming of less than 1 degree C since the world began emerging from the Little Ice Age a century and a half ago. So what? This whole line of argument is a Straw Man, which wilfully misrepresents the sceptical position. It’s not whether or not climate changes that preoccupies sceptics. It’s whether recent warming is significantly man-made – and if it is, whether, it’s something we should worry about, and whether it’s within our means or in our interest to do anything about it anyway.

But the real issue here, of course, is that like Big Tech’s near-blanket banning of Alex Jones, it’s the thin end of the wedge.

Read more

FOLLOW THE LINK FOR THE FULL REPORT – JR

https://www.infowars.com/now-youtube-is-adding-fact-checks-to-videos-that-question-climate-change/