Study: Birth Control Impairs Women’s Recognition of Complex Emotions

The pill could be blurring your social judgement — but perhaps not enough so you’d notice.

By challenging women to identify complex emotional expressions like pride or contempt, rather than basic ones like happiness or fear, scientists have revealed subtle changes in emotion recognition associated with oral contraceptive pill (OCP) use.

Published in Frontiers in Neuroscience, their study found that OCP users were nearly 10% worse on average than non-users in deciphering the most enigmatic emotional expressions, raising questions over the possible impact of OCPs on social interactions in intimate relationships.

What Are the Risks and Benefits of OCP Use?Women deciding whether to take an oral contraceptive have access to a lot of reliable information about the potential physical effects.Besides birth control, hormonal contraceptives can help control acne, heavy periods and endometriosis — as well as reducing the risk of ovarian, uterine and colon cancers. On the downside, the pill can increase slightly the risk of breast and cervical cancer, blood clots and high blood pressure.But the psychological effects of OCP use are less well documented.“More than 100 million women worldwide use oral contraceptives, but remarkably little is known about their effects on emotion, cognition and behavior,” says study senior author Dr. Alexander Lischke of the University of Greifswald, Germany.“However, coincidental findings suggest that oral contraceptives impair the ability to recognize emotional expressions of others, which could affect the way users initiate and maintain intimate relationships.”OCP Users are Worse at Recognizing Subtle Expressions of Complex EmotionsTo further investigate the effects of OCPs on women’s emotion recognition, the researchers administered a special emotion recognition task to two similar groups of healthy women: 42 OCP users, and 53 non-users.“If oral contraceptives caused dramatic impairments in women’s emotion recognition, we would have probably noticed this in our everyday interactions with our partners,” suggests Lischke. “We assumed that these impairments would be very subtle, indicating that we had to test women’s emotion recognition with a task that was sensitive enough to detect such impairments. We, thus, used a very challenging emotion recognition task that required the recognition of complex emotional expressions from the eye region of faces”The results were, as expected, subtle — but very clear: OCP users were less accurate in the recognition of the most subtle complex expressions than non-users — by nearly 10%, on average.“Whereas the groups were equally good at recognizing easy expressions, the OCP users were less likely to correctly identify difficult expressions.”The effect held for both positive and negative expressions, and regardless of the type of OCP or the menstrual cycle phase of non-users.

(Photo by U.S. Air Force photo illustration by Tech. Sgt. Mark R. W. Orders-Woempner)
Should Clinical Guidelines Change?According to Lischke, the findings are consistent with previous research.“Cyclic variations of estrogen and progesterone levels are known to affect women’s emotion recognition, and influence activity and connections in associated brain regions. Since oral contraceptives work by suppressing estrogen and progesterone levels, it makes sense that oral contraceptives also affect women’s emotion recognition However, the exact mechanism underlying oral contraceptive induced changes in women’s emotion recognition remains to be elucidated.”He stresses the need for further studies that replicate and extend the findings of the present study before thinking about changing current guidelines regarding the prescription of OCPs.“Further studies are needed to investigate whether oral contraceptive-induced impairments in emotion recognition depend on the type, duration or timing of use. These studies should also investigate whether these impairments actually alter women’s ability to initiate and maintain intimate relationships. If this turns out to be true, we should provide women with more detailed information about the consequences of oral contraceptive use.”FOLLOW THE LINK FOR THE FULL REPORT – JR
What Are the Risks and Benefits of OCP Use?Women deciding whether to take an oral contraceptive have access to a lot of reliable information about the potential physical effects.Besides birth control, hormonal contraceptives can help control acne, heavy periods and endometriosis — as well as reducing the risk of ovarian, uterine and colon cancers. On the downside, the pill can increase slightly the risk of breast and cervical cancer, blood clots and high blood pressure.But the psychological effects of OCP use are less well documented.“More than 100 million women worldwide use oral contraceptives, but remarkably little is known about their effects on emotion, cognition and behavior,” says study senior author Dr. Alexander Lischke of the University of Greifswald, Germany.“However, coincidental findings suggest that oral contraceptives impair the ability to recognize emotional expressions of others, which could affect the way users initiate and maintain intimate relationships.”OCP Users are Worse at Recognizing Subtle Expressions of Complex EmotionsTo further investigate the effects of OCPs on women’s emotion recognition, the researchers administered a special emotion recognition task to two similar groups of healthy women: 42 OCP users, and 53 non-users.“If oral contraceptives caused dramatic impairments in women’s emotion recognition, we would have probably noticed this in our everyday interactions with our partners,” suggests Lischke. “We assumed that these impairments would be very subtle, indicating that we had to test women’s emotion recognition with a task that was sensitive enough to detect such impairments. We, thus, used a very challenging emotion recognition task that required the recognition of complex emotional expressions from the eye region of faces”The results were, as expected, subtle — but very clear: OCP users were less accurate in the recognition of the most subtle complex expressions than non-users — by nearly 10%, on average.“Whereas the groups were equally good at recognizing easy expressions, the OCP users were less likely to correctly identify difficult expressions.”The effect held for both positive and negative expressions, and regardless of the type of OCP or the menstrual cycle phase of non-users.
(Photo by U.S. Air Force photo illustration by Tech. Sgt. Mark R. W. Orders-Woempner)
Should Clinical Guidelines Change?According to Lischke, the findings are consistent with previous research.“Cyclic variations of estrogen and progesterone levels are known to affect women’s emotion recognition, and influence activity and connections in associated brain regions. Since oral contraceptives work by suppressing estrogen and progesterone levels, it makes sense that oral contraceptives also affect women’s emotion recognition However, the exact mechanism underlying oral contraceptive induced changes in women’s emotion recognition remains to be elucidated.”He stresses the need for further studies that replicate and extend the findings of the present study before thinking about changing current guidelines regarding the prescription of OCPs.“Further studies are needed to investigate whether oral contraceptive-induced impairments in emotion recognition depend on the type, duration or timing of use. These studies should also investigate whether these impairments actually alter women’s ability to initiate and maintain intimate relationships. If this turns out to be true, we should provide women with more detailed information about the consequences of oral contraceptive use.”FOLLOW THE LINK FOR THE FULL REPORT – JR

https://www.infowars.com/study-birth-control-impairs-womens-recognition-of-complex-emotions/

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Learn as you sleep: study shows sleepers can learn language from scratch in the depths of slumber

People can learn a new language in their sleep, a new study suggests.

A groundbreaking experiment established it was possible to learn new words and their semantic associations from scratch while in the depths of sleep.

Scientists already know that the fragile neurological connections that form the basis of memory are strengthened during deep sleep, and previous studies have shown that words learned during consciousness can be consolidated by being repeated to a person during sleep.

FOLLOW THE LINK FOR THE FULL REPORT – JR

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/2019/01/31/learn-sleep-study-shows-sleepers-can-learn-language-scratch/

Half of people who think they have a food allergy do not – study

The number of adults who think they have a food allergy is almost double the figure who actually have one, research has revealed.

While the study was conducted in the US, experts say a similar situation is also seen in other countries, including the UK. The researchers found that many people with an allergy do not have a prescription for potentially life-saving medication, while others might be avoiding foods unnecessarily.

The study suggests almost 11% of adults in the US have a food allergy, equating to more than 26 million people. About 12 million of these are estimated to have developed the allergy as an adult, highlighting that allergies do not only begin in childhood.

“This is really concerning because chances are they could eat the food and then all of a sudden they have a reaction to a food that they could previously tolerate – so what changed in their environment or in them that caused them to now develop this food allergy?” said Ruchi Gupta, a professor of paediatrics at Northwestern University and a co-author of the research.

“Some of these foods you know that they probably were able to eat [previously] because they are such common foods in the diet, but shellfish was interesting – it could be one that they are trying for the first time as an adult.”

Gideon Lack, a professor of paediatric allergy at King’s College London, who was not involved in the research, said the growing problem of food allergies in adults might be linked to the dramatic rise seen in children over the past 20 years.

“We have been focusing efforts and concerns about food allergy in children, and this study is telling us there is a very significant burden of food-allergic disease in adults and we ought to be directing more attention and resources towards diagnosing and treating those adults,” he said.

Writing in the journal Jama Network Open, researchers in the US describe how they conducted a survey in two groups of participants between October 2015 and September 2016. In total more than 40,000 adults in the US took part.

Participants were asked if they had a food allergy and were questioned about their reactions and diagnoses. The team then assessed whether the reported allergy, whether diagnosed or not, was “convincing” – for example if the participant had experienced symptoms such as throat tightening or vomiting.

“If they only had, say, bloating or stomach pain or diarrhoea then we took them out because that could be a lactose intolerance or a food intolerance,” said Gupta.

The results reveal that the most common “convincing” allergy was to shellfish, affecting 2.9% of adults, with milk and peanuts in second and third place, affecting 1.9% and 1.8% of adults respectively.

But while 10.8% of participants were deemed to have at least one convincing food allergy, almost twice as many – 19% – reported they had such a problem.

“There are so many adults out there who have a negative reaction to a food. It is really important to get a proper diagnosis so that they can really know is this something treatable like lactose intolerance, or is this a life-threatening food allergy that they need to be very careful with,” said Gupta.

Of those with a “convincing” allergy, almost half said they had developed at least one of their food allergies as an adult, while about 38% said they had undertaken an emergency hospital visit as a result of a food allergy. However, only 48% said they had received a diagnosis from a doctor and just a quarter said they had a prescription for adrenaline, a common allergy treatment.

Prof Clare Mills, an expert in food allergies at the University of Manchester, welcomed the study but said it had limitations, including relying on self-reported data, including for symptoms. What’s more, she said, the healthcare system in the US is very different to the UK, meaning access to healthcare, and even the way adrenaline is prescribed, is very different.

Stephen Till, a professor of allergy at King’s College London, said the prevalence of “true” allergies seen in the study seemed surprisingly high, but the widespread misapprehension of having an allergy chimed with his clinical experience in the UK.

“I often see patients who think that they have a severe allergy who either aren’t allergic or who have mild allergy. They may have been unnecessarily prescribed adrenaline auto-injectors and be on a restricted diet avoiding even trace exposure to the suspected culprit,” he said, noting that this could cause significant anxiety and difficulties.

“Unfortunately … we have a shortage of physicians who are trained in adult allergy and so this amplifies these kinds of problems.”

FOLLOW THE LINK FOR THE FULL REPORT – JR

https://www.theguardian.com/society/2019/jan/04/half-of-people-who-think-they-have-a-food-allergy-do-not-study

Childhood Arthritis Linked to Vaccines

For people who think of arthritis as a disease of the elderly, learning that children also suffer from arthritic conditions may come as a shock.

Across age groups, various forms of arthritis are a growing public health problem in the United States. New cases of juvenile rheumatoid arthritis and other types of autoimmune arthritis in young Americans are two to three times higher than in Canada, with cases occurring within the wider context of proliferating pediatric autoimmune disorders. Over one four-year period (2001-2004), the number of ambulatory care visits for pediatric arthritis and other rheumatologic conditions increased by 50%.

The medical community lumps childhood arthritic disorders under the broader umbrella of “juvenile rheumatoid arthritis” or “juvenile idiopathic arthritis” (JIA). “Idiopathic” means “no identifiable cause.” There has been a predictable rush to pinpoint predisposing genetic factors, even though most of the genetic variations identified in JIA “are shared across other autoimmune disorders.” Of more practical relevance, an emerging consensus points to environmental factorsas major contributors to JIA, with childhood infections attracting particular attention.

In light of the interest in infections, how do we explain the deafening silence about the possible role of vaccines as an autoimmune trigger for JIA, when the stock-in-trade of vaccination is the “mimicking [of] a natural infection”? One study out of Brazil alludes to case reports linking autoimmune rheumatic diseases such as JIA to vaccination—but quickly dismisses the vaccine hypothesis as “controversial.” However, American children suffering from JIA and other debilitating autoimmune disorders deserve to know whether the dozens of vaccines they receive through age 18 are at least partially responsible for their misfortune.

DIMINISHED QUALITY OF LIFE

Childhood arthritis—a disorder that results in permanent joint damage—is characterized by joint pain, swelling, stiffness and other symptoms that interfere with activities of daily living such as dressing and walking. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) understatedly describes the quality-of-life impact of JIA on all spheres of a child’s life as follows: “Juvenile arthritis can make it hard to take part in social and after-school activities, and it can make schoolwork more difficult.”

Currently, one child in 1,000 develops some form of chronic arthritis—about twice the estimated prevalence of the early 1980s. A diagnosis typically is conferred when a child under age 16 has experienced joint swelling for at least six weeks.

ASSEMBLING VACCINE-RELATED CLUES

Although JIA onset can be as young as six months of age, studies looking at childhood patterns of arthritis report dual peaks of onset in toddlers (1-2 years of age) and just prior to adolescence (8-12 years of age). The childhood vaccine schedule administers multiple vaccines during both of those windows, including hepatitis B vaccination in infancy and the first dose of the human papillomavirus (HPV) and meningococcal vaccines at ages 11-12 (or earlier). A study published in 2001 found a temporal association between the infant hepatitis B vaccine and chronic arthritis (as well as other adverse health outcomes) “in the general population of US children.”

Among the possible infectious candidates for JIA, researchers have pointed to several specific viruses—including influenza, rubella and Mycoplasma pneumoniae—that may “initiate or augment this chronic disorder.” One intriguing historical study found that prenatal or neonatal presensitization to influenza triggered the subsequent onset of JIA upon reexposure to influenza virus. Does influenza vaccination, which targets pregnant women as well as children beginning at six months of age, represent a form of prenatal and neonatal “presensitization” to influenza capable of laying the groundwork for JIA?

This is a reasonable question to ask, particularly because of the seasonal pattern of JIA onset, with the winter months (just after influenza vaccination) representing “the peak time of year for new cases of JIA to present.” Moreover, a look at the package inserts of common childhood flu shots shows that arthralgia and arthritis (terms often used interchangeably to describe joint pain) are documented adverse reactions of the vaccines, both in clinical trials and postmarketing reports. Consider the two GlaxoSmithKline influenza vaccine formulations approved for children six months of age and older:

  • The package insert for the Fluarix Quadrivalent influenza vaccine describes arthralgia as one of the “most common systemic adverse reactions” in children aged 6 through 17 years—documented in one in ten children in that age group.
  • The Flulaval Quadrivalent influenza vaccine package insert shows that 13% of children (aged 5 through 17 years) reported arthralgia, described as a “systemic adverse event.”

It is somewhat more challenging to consider the association of rubella vaccination with joint pain because children typically are vaccinated for rubella in the context of one of two combination vaccines: measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) or measles-mumps-rubella-varicella (MMRV). However, Merck manufactures a live virus rubella vaccine (Meruvax II). In the package insert, the company cautions that “postpubertal females should be informed of the frequent occurrence of generally self-limited arthralgia and/or arthritis beginning 2 to 4 weeks after vaccination.” Citing incidence rates for arthritis and arthralgia of 0% to 3% in children and 12% to 26% in adult women, the Meruvax II insert states that reactions in adolescent girls “appear to be intermediate in incidence between those seen in children and in adult women.”

Flu vaccine (Photo by Sergei Bobylev / Contributor via Getty Images)

There is no human vaccine for Mycoplasma pneumoniae (or M. pneumoniae), a species of bacteria typically associated with mild respiratory infections in humans (sometimes called “walking pneumonia”). (Efforts to develop a human vaccine have failed because they have, “ironically,…often led to exacerbation of disease.” However, six companies manufacture related pig vaccines in the U.S.) Disturbingly, mycoplasma are “commonly found as including in viral vaccine production, and “are too small to be seen under a standard lab microscope.” Although “the detection of mycoplasma contamination is of utmost concern in…vaccine manufacturing”—not least because contamination has the potential to “disrupt patterns of human gene expression”—studies have found that “half of all lab scientists fail to check for the presence of Mycoplasma in their cell cultures.”

METALS AND ARTHRITIS

A 2018 study published in Environmental Research notes that individuals with rheumatoid arthritis and other connective tissue diseases often display sensitivity to heavy metals such as mercury and nickel. The researchers hypothesize that “metal-specific T cell reactivity can act as an etiological agent in the propagation and chronification of rheumatic inflammation” (where “chronification” refers to the progression from transient to persistent). Holistic health practitioners would not be surprised by this hypothesis, having warned for years that the symptoms of heavy metal toxicity can “mimic those of certain autoimmune diseases,” including various types of arthritis.

Both Flulaval and Fluzone (some of the most commonly prescribed flu vaccines for children) contain thimerosal, the mercury-based vaccine preservative. In addition, numerous other vaccines on the childhood vaccine schedule contain aluminum.

Although researchers have noted that the mechanism linking infection to autoimmunity “is complex and multifaceted,” the phenomenon of “molecular mimicry” (whereby the immune system attacks “self” antigens that are structurally similar to “non-self” antigens) offers one likely explanation. Some investigators have posited that the aluminum adjuvants in vaccines can induce autoimmune illness through an acceleration of molecular mimicry. Do the metals in childhood vaccines play a role in triggering JIA? This is just one of many critical unanswered questions that need to be answered concerning the potential role of vaccination in the autoimmunity epidemics affecting both children and adults.

The viewpoints expressed here do not necessarily represent those of Global Media Sentry.

FOLLOW THE LINK FOR THE FULL REPORT – JR

https://www.infowars.com/childhood-arthritis-linked-to-vaccines/

Neuron Breakthrough a Boon for Huntington’s Disease Treatment

A hallmark of neurodegenerative diseases like Huntington’s is the progressive death of nerve cells in the brain.

The cells don’t die quickly, though. They first start to disconnect from each other because their neurites—long finger-like extensions that make connections all through the brain—become smaller.

Now, using animal models and nerve cells grown in the lab, researchers from the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine suggest a new mechanism dubbed “neuritosis” that might explain neurons shrinking in Huntington’s and other neurodegenerative diseases, opening new targets for therapy. The study is published this week in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

“Neuritosis is a process that hasn’t been recognized or described until now and could play a very important role in normal brain development, aging and neurodegenerative disease,” said senior author Robert Friedlander, M.D., chair and Walter E. Dandy Professor of Neurosurgery and Neurobiology at Pitt’s School of Medicine.

It all started when Sergei Baranov, Ph.D., a staff scientist in Friedlander’s lab, noticed an interesting phenomenon in mouse nerve cells that he was growing in the lab.

“Their mitochondria, the cellular powerhouses, weren’t working as well at the neurite ends” said Baranov. Then, when the researchers looked at neurons in the spinal cords of mice, they found the same phenomenon. “Other researchers must have noticed this as well, but we were able to visualize it and suggest the potential cause as well as outcome,” he noted.

The researchers found that when proteins in mitochondria at the ends of neurites were damaged by normal wear and tear, newer ones weren’t coming in to replace them as quickly as they did for mitochondria near the nucleus. This made them function less efficiently, which activated ‘executioner’ enzymes called caspases and ultimately led to neurites withering away.

Friedlander and his team called this neuritosis, a variation on apoptosis, the cell death process that involves caspase activation. “It’s quite intuitive, once we discovered how it works,” said Friedlander. “Neuronal projections are really long and the farther you are from the nucleus, which is the central factory, the harder it gets to repair and replenish the cellular machinery, making the ends more vulnerable to even small stresses.”

The researchers then wanted to understand whether neuritosis plays a role in neurodegenerative disease, and they had reason to suspect that it does. Previous work in Friedlander’s lab showed that mutations in huntingtin, the protein linked to Huntington’s, interferes with the same protein supply chain that breaks down in neuritosis.

To test their hunch, Friedlander’s team used genetically modified mice that carried a mutant version of the human huntingtin protein. These mice exhibit symptoms of the disease, including accelerated neuronal death. Their findings were similar to what they had seen in the cells, but more pronounced. There were fewer mitochondria at the ends, and what remained was more dysfunctional than in normal neurons. There was also more activation of caspases, and increased levels of cell death.

“It’s quite likely that neuritosis happens in nerve cells normally and doesn’t result in cell death, but in neurodegenerative diseases, there are higher levels of stress to the already vulnerable neurite ends, which could push neuritosis over the edge and lead to cells dying,” said Friedlander. “If we can somehow find a way to keep mitochondria at nerve ends healthy, it may be beneficial in treating neurodegenerative diseases.”

FOLLOW THE LINK FOR THE FULL REPORT – JR

https://www.infowars.com/neuron-breakthrough-a-boon-for-huntingtons-disease-treatment/

Alzheimer’s Linked to Blood Transfusions

A now-banned type of blood transfusion which was used globally until the 1980s may have given people Alzheimer’s, a new study claims.

Between 1958 and 1985, abnormally short children in the US and the UK were given hormones harvested from cadavers to help spur their growth.

But in the early 1980s, there was a global outbreak of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), a fatal neurological disorder – and it was traced back to the blood transfusions.

Read more

FOLLOW THE LINK FOR THE FULL REPORT – JR

https://www.infowars.com/alzheimers-linked-to-blood-transfusions/

Parents’ Brain Activity “Echoes” Their Infant’s Brain Activity When They Play Together

When infants are playing with objects, their early attempts to pay attention to things are accompanied by bursts of high-frequency activity in their brain.

But what happens when parents play together with them?

New research, publishing December 13 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology, by Dr. Sam Wass of the University of East London in collaboration with Dr. Victoria Leong (Cambridge University and Nanyang Technological University, Singapore) and colleagues, shows for the first time that when adults are engaged in joint play together with their infant, their own brains show similar bursts of high-frequency activity. Intriguingly, these bursts of activity are linked to their baby’s attention patterns and not their own.

The authors simultaneously recorded electroencephalography (EEG) data from 12-month-old infants and their mothers when they were playing separately or together with toys. “Most infants spend the majority of their waking hours in the company of others. But almost everything we know about early learning in the brain comes from studies looking at individual baby brains in isolation,” said Dr. Wass, lead author on the study. “By recording activity in a baby’s brain and their mother’s brain at the same time, we were able to see how changes in their brain activity reflected their own or each other’s behavior while they were playing together.”

“We know that, when an adult plays jointly together with a child, this helps the child to sustain attention to things,” he continued. “But until now we haven’t really understood why this is. Our findings suggested that, when a baby pays attention to things, the adult’s brain tracks and responds to her infant’s looking behavior—as if her infants’ actions are echoed in the parent’s brain activity. And we also found that, where the parent’s brain is more responsive to the child, the child sustains their attention for longer.”

Dr. Leong, senior author on the study, said, “Our project asks more questions than it answers. We don’t know, for example, whether some parents are more responsive to their babies than others—and if so, why. And our study just looked at mums, so we don’t know whether mums and dads may be different in how they respond neurally to their babies. Our findings are exciting, but there is a lot more to investigate about how, exactly, this type of neural responsiveness by parents may help young children to learn.”

FOLLOW THE LINK FOR THE FULL REPORT – JR

https://www.infowars.com/parents-brain-activity-echoes-their-infants-brain-activity-when-they-play-together/

CDC Data Shows Strong Relationship Between MMR Vaccine, Autism

Note: After four long years, CHD Board Member, Dr. Brian Hooker‘s reanalysis of the CDC’s MMR-autism data from the original DeStefano et al. 2004 Pediatrics paper has been republished in the Winter 2018 Edition of the Journal of American Physicians and Surgeons.

The data, when properly analyzed, using the CDC’s own study protocol, show a strong, statistically significant relationship between the timing of the first MMR vaccine and autism, specifically in African American males.

In addition, a relationship also exists in the timing of the MMR vaccine and those individuals who were diagnosed with autism without mental retardation. These relationships call into question the conclusion of the original DeStefano et al. 2004 paper which dismissed a connection between the MMR vaccine and autism.

MAIN POINTS FROM REANALYSIS:

  • The rate of autism diagnoses has increased alarmingly in the U.S., and is about 25 percent higher in black children. Boys are far more likely than girls to receive this diagnosis.
  • As early as 2001, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) had data showing an increased rate of autism diagnoses in black male school children in Atlanta who received their first measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccination before 36 months of age.
  • The original publication concerning the data downplayed the association, and no follow-up was conducted.
  • Dr. Hooker noted that the CDC deviated from its original data analysis plan, possibly because of unwanted results.
  • The relationship loses its statistical significance if the analysis is restricted to children with a Georgia birth certificate, which decreases the sample size by about 40 percent.
  • Dr. Hooker reanalyzed the same data set using the same methodology of conditional logistic regression but didn’t exclude children lacking a Georgia birth certificate.
  • By stratifying data for African-American males by birth year, Dr. Hooker also found a statistically significant higher risk of an autism diagnosis in children who had received the first MMR vaccine 1 year earlier, only in children born in 1990 or later. Thimerosal exposure increased in the early 1990s, and it was not removed from most pediatric vaccines until 2001-2004. Dr. Hooker suggests the possibility that there may be some interaction between increased mercury exposure and early MMR vaccination. Further study would be needed to explore this possibility.
  • Dr. Hooker’s interest was sparked, he reports, by communication with a CDC whistleblower, a senior scientist, who had retained some of the original analyses.
  • Dr. Hooker concludes that failure to follow-up on these observations represents a huge lost opportunity to understand possible reasons for the enormous increase in this devastating neurological disability.

INTRODUCTION FROM DR. HOOKER’S ARTICLE:

“This study is a re-analysis of Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) data pertaining to the relationship of autism incidence and the age at which children got their first measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine. Statistically significant relationships were observed when African-American males were considered separately while looking at those individuals who were vaccinated prior to and after a 36-month age cut-off. CDC officials observed very similar relationships as early as November 2001, but failed to report them in their final publication. In addition, a relationship is seen when specifically considering children who received a diagnosis of autism without mental retardation. Although this was reported in the original 2004 paper, it was not discussed, nor was any follow-up study conducted. Preliminary results also suggest the possibility of a synergism between thimerosal exposure and MMR timing leading to a greater risk of autism.”

CONCLUSION FROM DR. HOOKER’S ARTICLE:

“The first data set used by DeStefano et.al represents a huge lost opportunity to understand any role between the timing of the first MMR vaccine and autism. The re-analysis presented here elucidates effects that should at least merit further investigation. Specifically, increased risks of earlier vaccination are observed for African-American males and among cases of autism without MR. Both phenomena deserve additional study that could yield important clues regarding the current enormous increase in autism.”

Dr. Hooker’s Reanalysis of CDC Data on Autism Incidence and Time of First MMR Vaccination was published December 7, 2018 in the Journal of American Physicians and Surgeons.

The viewpoints expressed here do not necessarily represent those of Global Media Sentry.

FOLLOW THE LINK FOR THE FULL REPORT – JR

https://www.infowars.com/cdc-data-shows-strong-relationship-between-mmr-vaccine-autism-report/

Cancer-Causing Chemicals in Drinking Water Lead to Increased Testing

Public water supplies around the country are increasing efforts to test for chemicals linked to cancer and other diseases after studies revealed millions of Americans may now be exposed to the toxins.

In Brevard County, Fla., groundwater testing this year near Patrick Air Force Base show high levels of perfluorooctane sulfonate and perfluorooctanoic acid, two water-resistant chemicals that used to be found in firefighting foam, as well as a variety of household products, ranging from no-stick frying pans to carpet-cleaning agents, and even the film inside microwave popcorn bags. And according to reports, several young women have been diagnosed with different types of cancer in the immediate area within just a few years of each other.

The chemicals have been phased out since 2015 by major chemical companies like Dupont and 3M at the suggestion of the Environmental Protection Agency. But they were in common use since the 1950s and have since been found in water supplies across the country.

Read more

FOLLOW THE LINK FOR THE FULL REPORT – JR

https://www.infowars.com/cancer-causing-chemicals-in-drinking-water-lead-to-increased-testing/

Pew Survey: Out Of 27 Nations Polled, Zero Want More Immigrants to Move to Their Country

Though the lying media in all of our nations act as though everyone opposed to open borders immigration policies are racist bigots, a new Pew Research survey shows not one single major country out of 27 polled wants more immigrants.

From Pew Research:

As the number of international migrants reaches new highs, people around the world show little appetite for more migration – both into and out of their countries, according to a Pew Research Center survey of 27 nations conducted in the spring of 2018.

Across the countries surveyed, a median of 45% say fewer or no immigrants should be allowed to move to their country, while 36% say they want about the same number of immigrants. Just 14% say their countries should allow more immigrants. (Those who said no immigrants should be allowed volunteered this response.)

In Europe, majorities in Greece (82%), Hungary (72%), Italy (71%) and Germany (58%) say fewer immigrants or no immigrants at all should be allowed to move to their countries. Each of these countries served as some of the most popular transit or destination countries during Europe’s recent surge in asylum seekers. (In several countries, most disapprove of how the European Union has handled the refugee issue.)

People in other countries around the world hold views similar to those in Europe. Large majorities in Israel (73%), Russia (67%), South Africa (65%) and Argentina (61%) say their countries should let in fewer immigrants. In every country surveyed, less than a third say their nation should allow more immigrants to enter.

Worldwide, a record 258 million people lived outside their country of birth in 2017, up from 153 million in 1990. Their share of the global population is also up, reaching 3.4% in 2017, compared with 2.9% in 1990.

In recent years, a surge in migration has focused public attention on issues related to this, leading to the rise of political parties that question national immigration policies in some destination countries. More than 2 million migrants have sought asylum in Europe since 2015. In the Americas, thousands of Central American families and children have sought to enter the United States. (Recently, immigration has declined as an issue of public concern in parts of Western Europe, even as it has remained a top issue in U.S.)

Together, the 27 countries surveyed by the Center have more than half of the world’s international migrants. The U.S., with 44.5 million immigrants in 2017, has the largest foreign-born population in the world, followed bySaudi Arabia (12.2 million), Germany (12.2 million) and Russia (11.7 million).

Meanwhile, among the countries surveyed, immigrants make up the largest shares of national populations in Australia (29%), Israel (24%), Canada (22%) and Sweden (18%). About 14% of the U.S. population is foreign born, a share comparable to that of Germany (15%), the UK (13%) and Spain (13%).

The 67 million or so recent immigrants already in the US want all their families and extend families to come in through chain migration, that’s why the numbers are so high.

Nonetheless, more Americans want fewer immigrants or none than want more.

This goes hand and hand with a new report from Gallup showing more than 750 million people worldwide would migrate if they could — with the top destination being the United States.

FOLLOW THE LINK FOR THE FULL REPORT – JR

https://www.infowars.com/pew-survey-out-of-27-nations-polled-zero-want-more-immigrants-to-move-to-their-country/