Tommy Robinson’s Emergency Message To Donald Trump

Tommy Robinson was previously imprisoned for his views on globalism and open borders in Europe.

Now that he is running for parliament, he’s facing even more censorship.

Tommy joins Alex to discuss the effects of censorship on his campaign and the future of populism.

https://www.infowars.com/tommy-robinsons-emergency-message-to-donald-trump/

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Why is Apple so vulnerable to a trade war with China?

  • Apple closes down almost 6% on Monday after news of a major escalation in the U.S.-China trade war.
  • The company assembles iPhones in China, making it vulnerable to price increases if a tariff were to be placed on Chinese exports.
  • It also sells a lot of iPhones in China, making it sensitive to Chinese consumer confidence.
GP: Tim Cook China Development Forum 2019 In Beijing
CEO of Apple Tim Cook attends China Development Forum 2019 at the Diaoyutai State Guesthouse on March 23, 2019 in Beijing, China.
VCG | Getty Images

Apple closed down nearly 6% on Monday after news of a major escalation in the U.S.-China trade war.China said on Monday that it decided to raise tariffs on some U.S. goods after President Donald Trump threatened to further raise tariffs on Chinese imports last week.

The trade war is affecting a lot of different stocks, but Apple seems to be hit harder than most. The Dow Jones Industrial index dropped 2.6%, and the Nasdaq Composite dropped 3.5%.Apple is especially vulnerable to a trade war with China for two primary reasons.First, it assembles its iPhones primarily in China. Although it has a lot of American suppliers — it spent $60 billion on American suppliers in 2018 — iPhone assembly is done in mainland China.Whenever new tariffs are announced, investors must keep an eye on the details because it’s possible that some of Apple’s products could get caught in the crossfire.Morgan Stanley analyst Katy Huberty estimates that a 25% tariff on the iPhone could lead to a price increase of $160 for the iPhone XS. Or Apple could eat the tax, which could lead to a 23% decrease in earnings per share in 2020.

“Apple has one of the most significant exposures to Chinese exports to the US in our IT Hardware coverage group, given final assembly for many of its consumer electronic devices is located in China,” Huberty wrote in a note last week.“And given the reliance on China’s established, low-cost labor force and expertise in manufacturing/tooling, a large-scale move out of the country would not only be costly, but could take multiple years to complete, potentially raising the odds of execution risk, in our view,” the note continued.Last fall, a draft list of one of Trump’s round of China tariffs would have affected the Apple Watch and Apple AirPods, for example, although the final list did not affect Apple’s products.The other reason is that Apple, unlike other big tech companies, makes a substantial amount of its money by selling its products to Chinese consumers.Apple reported $51 billion in revenue in 2018 from “Greater China,” which includes Hong Kong and Taiwan. That’s Apple’s third-biggest region, after the Americas and Europe. Apple’s total revenue for the year was $265.6 billion.When Apple said earlier this year that its holiday quarter revenue would be significantly less than it had previously said to expect, it blamed a bad economic climate in China.“It’s clear that the economy began to slow there for the second half and what I believe to be the case is the trade tensions between the United States and China put additional pressure on their economy,” Apple CEO Tim Cook said in an interview with CNBC in January.“One of the reasons Apple CEO cited for China improvement was increased consumer confidence due to easing of US-China trade tensions,” UBS analyst Timothy Arcuri wrote in a note last week.“However, in recent days, trade tensions have escalated and it bears watching whether this affects China consumer sentiment,” the note continued.Apple has consistently opposed Trump’s proposed tariffs, and Cook has personally told Trump that Apple does not support implementing taxes on imports from China.Apple stock is up 24.9% since Jan. 1.
CEO of Apple Tim Cook attends China Development Forum 2019 at the Diaoyutai State Guesthouse on March 23, 2019 in Beijing, China.
VCG | Getty Images

Apple closed down nearly 6% on Monday after news of a major escalation in the U.S.-China trade war.China said on Monday that it decided to raise tariffs on some U.S. goods after President Donald Trump threatened to further raise tariffs on Chinese imports last week.

The trade war is affecting a lot of different stocks, but Apple seems to be hit harder than most. The Dow Jones Industrial index dropped 2.6%, and the Nasdaq Composite dropped 3.5%.Apple is especially vulnerable to a trade war with China for two primary reasons.First, it assembles its iPhones primarily in China. Although it has a lot of American suppliers — it spent $60 billion on American suppliers in 2018 — iPhone assembly is done in mainland China.Whenever new tariffs are announced, investors must keep an eye on the details because it’s possible that some of Apple’s products could get caught in the crossfire.Morgan Stanley analyst Katy Huberty estimates that a 25% tariff on the iPhone could lead to a price increase of $160 for the iPhone XS. Or Apple could eat the tax, which could lead to a 23% decrease in earnings per share in 2020.

“Apple has one of the most significant exposures to Chinese exports to the US in our IT Hardware coverage group, given final assembly for many of its consumer electronic devices is located in China,” Huberty wrote in a note last week.“And given the reliance on China’s established, low-cost labor force and expertise in manufacturing/tooling, a large-scale move out of the country would not only be costly, but could take multiple years to complete, potentially raising the odds of execution risk, in our view,” the note continued.Last fall, a draft list of one of Trump’s round of China tariffs would have affected the Apple Watch and Apple AirPods, for example, although the final list did not affect Apple’s products.The other reason is that Apple, unlike other big tech companies, makes a substantial amount of its money by selling its products to Chinese consumers.Apple reported $51 billion in revenue in 2018 from “Greater China,” which includes Hong Kong and Taiwan. That’s Apple’s third-biggest region, after the Americas and Europe. Apple’s total revenue for the year was $265.6 billion.When Apple said earlier this year that its holiday quarter revenue would be significantly less than it had previously said to expect, it blamed a bad economic climate in China.“It’s clear that the economy began to slow there for the second half and what I believe to be the case is the trade tensions between the United States and China put additional pressure on their economy,” Apple CEO Tim Cook said in an interview with CNBC in January.“One of the reasons Apple CEO cited for China improvement was increased consumer confidence due to easing of US-China trade tensions,” UBS analyst Timothy Arcuri wrote in a note last week.“However, in recent days, trade tensions have escalated and it bears watching whether this affects China consumer sentiment,” the note continued.Apple has consistently opposed Trump’s proposed tariffs, and Cook has personally told Trump that Apple does not support implementing taxes on imports from China.Apple stock is up 24.9% since Jan. 1.
Apple closed down nearly 6% on Monday after news of a major escalation in the U.S.-China trade war.China said on Monday that it decided to raise tariffs on some U.S. goods after President Donald Trump threatened to further raise tariffs on Chinese imports last week.

The trade war is affecting a lot of different stocks, but Apple seems to be hit harder than most. The Dow Jones Industrial index dropped 2.6%, and the Nasdaq Composite dropped 3.5%.Apple is especially vulnerable to a trade war with China for two primary reasons.First, it assembles its iPhones primarily in China. Although it has a lot of American suppliers — it spent $60 billion on American suppliers in 2018 — iPhone assembly is done in mainland China.Whenever new tariffs are announced, investors must keep an eye on the details because it’s possible that some of Apple’s products could get caught in the crossfire.Morgan Stanley analyst Katy Huberty estimates that a 25% tariff on the iPhone could lead to a price increase of $160 for the iPhone XS. Or Apple could eat the tax, which could lead to a 23% decrease in earnings per share in 2020.

“Apple has one of the most significant exposures to Chinese exports to the US in our IT Hardware coverage group, given final assembly for many of its consumer electronic devices is located in China,” Huberty wrote in a note last week.“And given the reliance on China’s established, low-cost labor force and expertise in manufacturing/tooling, a large-scale move out of the country would not only be costly, but could take multiple years to complete, potentially raising the odds of execution risk, in our view,” the note continued.Last fall, a draft list of one of Trump’s round of China tariffs would have affected the Apple Watch and Apple AirPods, for example, although the final list did not affect Apple’s products.The other reason is that Apple, unlike other big tech companies, makes a substantial amount of its money by selling its products to Chinese consumers.Apple reported $51 billion in revenue in 2018 from “Greater China,” which includes Hong Kong and Taiwan. That’s Apple’s third-biggest region, after the Americas and Europe. Apple’s total revenue for the year was $265.6 billion.When Apple said earlier this year that its holiday quarter revenue would be significantly less than it had previously said to expect, it blamed a bad economic climate in China.“It’s clear that the economy began to slow there for the second half and what I believe to be the case is the trade tensions between the United States and China put additional pressure on their economy,” Apple CEO Tim Cook said in an interview with CNBC in January.“One of the reasons Apple CEO cited for China improvement was increased consumer confidence due to easing of US-China trade tensions,” UBS analyst Timothy Arcuri wrote in a note last week.“However, in recent days, trade tensions have escalated and it bears watching whether this affects China consumer sentiment,” the note continued.Apple has consistently opposed Trump’s proposed tariffs, and Cook has personally told Trump that Apple does not support implementing taxes on imports from China.Apple stock is up 24.9% since Jan. 1.

https://www.cnbc.com/2019/05/13/why-is-apple-so-vulnerable-to-a-trade-war-with-china.html

Beijing calls for ‘people’s war’ against US as Trump threatens tariffs on another $300 billion of Chinese goods in all-out trade battle

  • The US-China trade war has dramatically escalated over the past few days, with both sides announcing tariff increases on billions of dollars’ worth of each other’s goods.
  • Chinese state media — which functions as a Communist Party mouthpiece — issued a series of rabble-rousing statements on Monday accusing the US of “greed and arrogance” and calling for a “people’s war” against it.
  • President Donald Trump’s administration on Monday night threatened to impose tariffs of up to 25% on another $300 billion worth of Chinese goods.
  • If such tariffs were to be imposed, almost all Chinese imports to the US would be subject to tariffs.
  • Trump tweeted on Tuesday that his “respect and friendship” with Chinese President Xi Jinping was “unlimited” but that “this must be a great deal for the United States or it just doesn’t make any sense.

The US-China trade war continues to heat up, with Beijing calling for a “people’s war” against Washington and President Donald Trump threatening to impose tariffs on another $300 billion worth of Chinese goods.

https://www.businessinsider.com/trade-war-trump-mulls-more-tariffs-300bn-china-peoples-war-2019-5?utm_source=hearst&utm_medium=referral&utm_content=allverticals

Saudi Arabia oil stations attacked by drones

Dubai: Saudi Energy Minister Khalid Al Falih said on Tuesday that two oil pumping stations for the East-West pipeline had been hit by explosive-laden drones, calling the attack “an act of terrorism” that targeted global oil supplies.

Falih condemned the attacks in a statment saying: “The latest acts of terrorism and sabotage in the Arabian Gulf… not only target the Kingdom but also the security of oil supplies to the world and the global economy.”

“These attacks prove again that it is important for us to face terrorist entities, including the Houthi militias in Yemen that are backed by Iran,” he said.

Falih said Saudi oil output and exports for crude and refined products were continuing without disruption, but that the state oil giant Aramco had halted oil pumping in the pipeline while the damage was evaluated and the stations were repaired, according to a statement carried by the state news agency SPA.

The 1,200-kilometre pipeline carries crude from Saudi Arabia’s main eastern oil fields to the Red Sea port city of Yanbu in the west.

Oil prices go up

Oil prices rose sharply on Tuesday after the drone attack. Brent crude futures were at $71.15 a barrel at 1155 GMT, up 92 cents or 1.31 per cent, according to Reuters.

U.S. West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude futures were at $61.68 per barrel, up 64 cents or 1.05 per cent.

The pumping stations targeted lie west of the capital Riyadh, at Dawadmi and Afeef.

https://gulfnews.com/world/gulf/saudi/saudi-arabia-oil-stations-attacked-by-drones-1.63934993

Iran tensions: Pentagon plan to deploy 120,000 troops in case of escalation

At the direction of national security adviser John Bolton, acting Defense Secretary Patrick Shanahan last week presented top White House national security officials with a plan to send up to 120,000 troops to the Middle East in the event that Iran “attack American forces or accelerate work on nuclear weapons,” the New York Times reports.

Details: The plan was reportedly presented during a meeting about the Trump administration’s broader Iran policy, attended — among others — by Bolton, CIA director Gina Haspel, Joint Chiefs of Staff Chairman Gen. Joseph Dunford and Director of National Intelligence Dan Coats. It’s unclear if President Trump has been briefed on the details of the plan, which did not call for a land invasion of Iran, but requested a similar number of troops involved the U.S.’ 2003 invasion of Iraq, per the Times.

The big picture: Bolton and Secretary of State Mike Pompeo have been warning of an unspecified “escalating threat” from Iran in recent weeks, after receiving intelligence from Israel about a possible Iranian plot to attack U.S. interests in the region. Trump told reporters today that he’d been “hearing little stories about Iran,” adding: “If they do anything, they will suffer greatly.”

  • Saudi Arabia on Monday announced that two Saudi tankers were damaged by an “act of sabotage” over the weekend in the Gulf, without identifying any suspects. Iran’s foreign ministry distanced itself, calling the incident “worrisome” and “regretful.”
  • Later on Monday, AP and other media outlets cited an anonymous U.S. official as saying an “initial assessment is that Iranian or Iranian-backed proxies” were responsible.

https://www.axios.com/iran-military-troops-john-bolton-1d4a714c-ea52-483f-b392-2ac2af01f423.html

Macron Holding US Responsible If Iran Leaves Nuke Deal

On Wednesday, Tehran gave Europe 60 days to ensure Iran’s interests were protected under the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA).

Otherwise, Tehran is ready to take further steps on scrapping the JCPOA, it warned.

French President Emmanuel Macron said on Thursday that Washington would be responsible if Iranian authorities abandon the nuclear deal.

“Firstly, Iran did not withdraw this deal. Secondly, if Iran withdraws from this deal, it will be the responsibility of the United States. We will not mix the roles and say that it’s the Europeans,” the French leader said at a press conference following the informal summit of EU leaders in the Romanian city of Sibiu.

Macron pretends to hold “Great National Debate” while targeting protestors with live ammo and helicopter-deployed tear gas.

Macron’s remark follows the Russian Foreign Ministry’s announcement made earlier in the day that the United States must terminate any activities that hamper political and economic cooperation of other countries with Iran. This statement was made shortly after EU foreign policy chief Federica Mogherini noted that the European Union remains committed to the implementation of the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA), the nuclear deal signed with Iran in 2015, as long as the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) confirms that Tehran acts in accordance with the deal.

https://www.infowars.com/macron-holding-us-responsible-if-iran-leaves-nuke-deal/

The Deadline Passes And Trump Brings Down The Tariff Hammer – China Immediately Promises To Retaliate

At 12:01 AM eastern time on Friday, President Trump followed through on his threats and hit China with a massive tariff increase.

As you will see below, China immediately pledged to retaliate. U.S. and Chinese officials will continue to negotiate throughout the day on Friday, but if U.S. officials were optimistic that a deal was imminent the trigger never would have been pulled on these tariffs. At this point the gap between the negotiating positions of the two sides is still enormous, and that does not seem likely to change. The Chinese have been taking advantage of the United States for decades, and they wish to continue doing so. Meanwhile, President Trump and his advisers are absolutely determined to level the playing field. Unless one of the parties backs down in a major way, there is not going to be a trade agreement and this trade war is about to get very real, and that is extremely bad news for the global economy.

Just minutes ago, the deadline that the whole world was watching passed, and as expected Trump’s tariffs were imposed. The following comes from Bloomberg

The U.S. hiked tariffs on more than $200 billion in goods from China on Friday in the most dramatic step yet of Donald Trump’s push to extract trade concessions, deepening a conflict that has roiled financial markets and cast a shadow over the global economy.

China immediately said in a statement it is forced to retaliate, but didn’t specify how.

On Thursday evening, global markets were tentatively hopeful as U.S. and Chinese officials met to negotiate. According to White House Deputy Press Secretary Judd Deere, negotiations will continue in the morning

“This evening, (United States Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer) and (Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin) met with President Trump to discuss the ongoing trade negotiations with China. The Ambassador and Secretary then had a working dinner with Vice Premier Liu He, and agreed to continue discussions tomorrow morning at USTR,” Judd Deere, White House Deputy Press Secretary, said in a Thursday evening statement.

But the negotiations did not go well enough to even delay the implementation of the tariffs.

North Korea’s latest missile launches are straining US-led efforts to denuclearize the region. However, analysts are saying the trajectories indicate they are not “ballistic weapons.” Also, President Trump rocked the world’s economy after pledging to increase tariffs on Chinese goods. Trump slammed China for attempting to renegotiate after breaking a previous trade agreement. Joining today’s show is “civilized barbarian” Roosh Valizadeh discussing Big Tech’s political banning.

Trump followed through on what he promised he would do, and the Chinese say that they have “already prepared a response for all kinds of outcomes”

At the same time the Chinese side has already prepared a response for all kinds of outcomes, Gao Feng, commerce ministry spokesperson, said in Mandarin, according to a CNBC translation. He was speaking at Thursday’s weekly press conference.

It is likely that the Chinese did not immediately respond with new tariffs of their own because they would like to see how negotiations go on Friday.

In the end, the Chinese would love to get Trump to put a hold on tariffs yet again without giving him the trade agreement that he desperately wants. Throughout this process, the Chinese tactic has been to delay, delay, delay and they will undoubtedly do their best to try to kick the can down the road once again.

But Trump has figured out that they have been trying to run out the clock on his administration, and this time he is putting his foot down.

And without a doubt, it is definitely good to see a presidential administration finally standing up to the Chinese. They have been ruthlessly taking advantage of us and ripping us off blind for years, and that must stop.

Here is just one example of this that Trump often likes to share

“When a car is sent to the United States from China, there is a Tariff to be paid of 2 1/2%. When a car is sent to China from the United States, there is a Tariff to be paid of 25%,” Trump tweetedApril 9. “Does that sound like free or fair trade. No, it sounds like STUPID TRADE – going on for years!”

Of course Trump is exactly correct. It is not “free trade” and it is definitely not “fair trade”. If they want to impose 25 percent tariffs on our auto industry, they should expect the same treatment for their key industries in return.

All along, Trump has insisted that if China wants to remove all their tariffs that we would be willing to do the same thing, but the Chinese would never agree to do that.

So Trump is standing up to China, and that is a good thing.

Unfortunately, upsetting the status quo will also be exceedingly painful.

A full-blown trade war with China will be really, really bad for the global economy. If Trump understood how bad things could potentially get, he probably never would have gone down this road, because it is going to be exceedingly difficult to get re-elected if the economy tanks.

I think that a little review of what happened during our last trade war will help us get a little perspective on what could be ahead.

On June 17th, 1930 President Hoover signed the Smoot-Hawley Act which imposed tariffs on more than 20,000 imported goods.

This coincided with the worst economic downturn of the 20th century. U.S. GDP declined 8.5 percent in 1930, 6.4 percent in 1931 and 12.9 percent in 1932.

On June 12th, 1934 President Roosevelt signed the Reciprocal Tariff Act which essentially ended the trade war.

So what happened?

The U.S. economy grew 10.8 percent in 1934, 8.9 percent in 1935 and 12.9 percent in 1936.

Today, the global economy is far more interconnected than it was in the 1930s, and so the impact of a global trade war could potentially be much greater.

We need trade with China to be fair and balanced, but are we willing to go through an extraordinary amount of economic pain to get to that end result?

And once relations with China break down, will they ever be able to be repaired?

We are at a critical turning point in U.S. history, and nobody is going to be able to turn back time once the dominoes begin to fall.

In the end, we are all going to have to live with the decisions that the Trump administration is making right now, and so let us hope that wisdom prevails.

https://www.infowars.com/the-deadline-passes-and-trump-brings-down-the-tariff-hammer-china-immediately-promises-to-retaliate/

Mob Battles With Bats, Crowbars in UK Neighborhood

A mob of men were filmed brutally beating each other with bats and crowbars while yelling in Punjabi in Manchester, U.K., according to local media.

Videos of the melee shared to social media depict at least 10 combatants brawling in broad daylight as a bystander proclaims, “Ramadan is on Monday.”

“The brawl continues for several minutes with the men hurling abuse at each other in Punjabi and swearing,” the Bolton News reports.

“One of those involved in the fighting says in Punjabi ‘I am going to sort this out — my shoulder is dislocated,’ as well hurling further insults.”

The men continue to assault one another with weapons including baseball and cricket bats, crowbars, and golf clubs.

At one point, a man body slams another onto the hood of a car trapped in the intersection.

“Police received reports of a disturbance at 2:55 pm,” a Greater Manchester police spokesman told local media.

“When police arrived there was no fighting ongoing. Minor injuries have been reported from people believed to be involved. Enquiries are ongoing, no arrests were made.”

https://europe.infowars.com/punjabi-mob-battles-with-bats-crowbars-in-uk-neighborhood/

Islamic state claims responsibility for Sri Lanka bombings

Islamic state has claimed responsibility for coordinated bombings in Sri Lanka which killed 321 people and injured about 500 others, the group’s AMAQ news agency said on Tuesday.

The group did not give evidence for its claim. (Reporting by Omar Fahmy; Writing by Nadine Awadalla)

FOLLOW THE LINK FOR THE FULL REPORT – JR

http://news.trust.org/item/20190423103116-26pc2

U.S. sends message to Turkey, halts F-35 equipment shipments

The United States has halted delivery of equipment related to the stealthy F-35 fighter aircraft to Turkey, sources familiar with the situation said, marking the first concrete U.S. step to block delivery of the jet to the NATO ally in light of Ankara’s planned purchase of a Russian missile defense system.

In recent days, U.S. officials told their Turkish counterparts they will not receive further shipments of F-35 related equipment needed to prepare for the arrival of the stealthy jet, two sources familiar with the situation told Reuters. The aircraft is built by Lockheed Martin Corp.

The sources, speaking on condition of anonymity, said the next shipment of training equipment, and all subsequent shipments of F-35 related material, have been canceled.

Turkish President Tayyip Erdogan has refused to back down from Ankara’s planned purchase of a Russian S-400 missile defense system that the United States has said would compromise the security of F-35 aircraft. Turkey has said it will take delivery of the S-400s in July.

The disagreement over the F-35 is the latest of a series of diplomatic disputes between the United States and Turkey including Turkish demands that the United States extradite Islamic cleric Fethullah Gulen, differences over Middle East policy and the war in Syria, and sanctions on Iran.

A Pentagon official had told Reuters in March that the United States had a number of items it could withhold in order to send Turkey a signal that the United States was serious about Ankara dropping its ambition to own the S-400.

The Pentagon did not immediately respond to a request for comment. Turkish officials in Ankara were not immediately available for comment.

The U.S. decision on the F-35s was expected to complicate Turkish Foreign Minister Mevlut Cavusoglu’s planned visit to Washington this week for a NATO summit. The latest development in the F-35 dispute came a day after Erdogan suffered one of his biggest electoral losses in decades in local elections.

Reuters reported last week that Washington was exploring whether it could remove Turkey from production of the F-35. Turkey makes parts of the fuselage, landing gear and cockpit displays. Sources familiar with the F-35’s intricate worldwide production process and U.S. thinking on the issue last week said Turkey’s role can be replaced.

The United States and other NATO allies that own F-35s fear the radar on the Russian S-400 missile system will learn how to spot and track the jet, making it less able to evade Russian weapons in the future.

In an attempt to persuade Turkey to drop its plans to buy the S-400, the United States offered the pricier American-made Patriot anti-missile system in a discounted deal that expired at the end of March. Turkey has shown interest in the Patriot system, but not at the expense of abandoning the S-400.

Turkey has engaged with U.S. negotiators in recent days about buying the Patriot system, a person familiar with the matter said. The system is made by Raytheon Co.

FOLLOW THE LINK FOR THE FULL REPORT – JR

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-usa-turkey-f35-exclusive/exclusive-u-s-sends-message-to-turkey-halts-f-35-equipment-shipments-sources-idUSKCN1RD316