Twitter Followers Vanish Amid Inquiries Into Fake Accounts

The Times found evidence that the information of Twitter users in every state — including thousands of people in Florida and New York — had been copied onto bots sold by Devumi or rival companies.

The Distribution of Deception

At least 55,000 fake accounts use the names, profile pictures, hometowns and other personal details of real Twitter users, including minors, according to a Times data analysis. The original accounts list locations in all 50 U.S. states.

FOLLOW THE LINK FOR THE FULL REPORT – JR

https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2018/01/31/technology/social-media-bots-investigations.html

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Train carrying members of Congress hits a truck, 1 dead

A train carrying members of Congress — including House Speaker Paul Ryan — to their legislative retreat in West Virginia hit a truck Wednesday, multiple sources told CNN, leaving at least one person dead.

Multiple sources said that all members of Congress on the train and their families were OK, with the exception of a few minor injuries. White House press secretary Sarah Sanders confirmed in a statement that there was at least one fatality from the collision, though it was unclear who that was.
“The President has been fully briefed on the situation in Virginia and is receiving regular updates,” Sanders said in her statement. “There is one confirmed fatality and one serious injury. There are no serious injuries among members of Congress or their staff.”
An aide confirmed Ryan was on the train and is fine. Separately, a congressman on the train told CNN most of the staff and members on the train are OK.

FOLLOW THE LINK FOR THE FULL REPORT – JR

http://www.cnn.com/2018/01/31/politics/congress-train-accident/index.html

ACLU Complains: “Trump Used the Word ‘America’ More Than 80 Times”

The American Civil Liberties Union — note the word “American” in its title — complained Tuesday night about President Trump’s repeated use of the word “America” in his State of the Union speech.

In a written response to Trump’s speech, Faiz Shakir, the ACLU’s national political director, said:

Tonight, President Trump said the word ‘America’ more than 80 times in his speech. Yet, after a divisive first year, we hear and feel how exclusionary that ‘America’ is, with policies that have harmed so many vulnerable American communities. The ACLU stands ready to protect these communities, both in the courts and at the polls.

In particular, the immigration plan put forth by Trump would hold Dreamers hostage to his demands for a harmful border wall and an even larger mass deportation force. We are at this crossroads because of the President’s deeply destructive ideas fomented by his nativist allies and divisive rhetoric. We will continue to stand up for these young immigrants and ensure they continue to contribute to our country. We cannot let America’s Dreamers be deported.

President Trump told the nation Monday night that Congress will be voting on an “immigration reform” package over the next few weeks, and he outlined the “four pillars” of his “fair compromise” plan:

FOLLOW THE LINK FOR THE FULL REPORT – JR

https://www.cnsnews.com/news/article/susan-jones/aclu-complains-trump-said-america-more-80-times-his-speech-its-exclusionary

Viewers approve of Trump’s first State of the Union address

Eight in 10 Americans who watched tonight felt that the president was trying to unite the country, rather than divide it. Two-thirds said the speech made them feel proud, though just a third said it made them feel safer. Fewer said the speech made them feel angry or scared.

FOLLOW THE LINK FOR THE FULL REPORT – JR

https://www.cbsnews.com/news/viewers-approve-of-trumps-first-state-of-the-union-address-cbs-news-poll/

Not there yet, but US officials warn N.Korea soon to perfect ICBM

North Korea has taken fresh strides in its nuclear missile program but has not shown all the technologies needed to strike America, a US general said Tuesday, as another top official warned such a capability is just months away.

Pyongyang has demonstrated its rockets are powerful enough to reach the United States, but General Paul Selva, vice chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, said it has yet to prove that its fusing and targeting technologies can survive the stresses of ballistic missile flight.

“They have made some strides but it’s still true that they haven’t demonstrated all of the components of an intercontinental ballistic missile system,” Selva told reporters.

FOLLOW THE LINK FOR THE FULL REPORT – JR

https://www.yahoo.com/news/n-korea-not-yet-shown-icbm-ready-hit-152813350.html

Trump State of the Union: A new American moment

President Donald Trump on Tuesday delivered his State of the Union address to the nation. The president sought to strike a positive tone and describe a “New American Moment” characterized by prosperity, rebuilding and cooperation.

“There has never been a better time to start living the American dream,” Trump said. “I want to talk about what kind of future we are going to have, and what kind of nation we are going to be.”

The official theme of the speech was “a safe, strong and proud America,” and Trump aimed to take a victory lap for his newly enacted tax cuts, and for the overall strength of the U.S. economy.

FOLLOW THE LINK FOR THE FULL REPORT – JR

https://www.cnbc.com/2018/01/30/trump-state-of-the-union-a-new-american-moment.html

Renewables Aren’t Enough. Clean Coal Is the Future

PROOF THAT GOOD things don’t always come in nice packages can be found by taking the fast train from Beijing to Tianjin and then driving to the coast. Tianjin, China’s third-biggest city, originated as Beijing’s port on the Yellow Sea. But in recent years Tianjin has reclaimed so much of its muddy, unstable shoreline that the city has effectively moved inland and a new, crazily active port has sprung up at the water’s edge. In this hyper-industrialized zone, its highways choked with trucks, stand scores of factories and utility plants, each a mass of pipes, reactors, valves, vents, retorts, crackers, blowers, chimneys, and distillation towers—the sort of facility James Cameron might have lingered over, musing, on his way to film the climax of Terminator 2.

Among these edifices, just as big and almost as anonymous as its neighbors, is a structure called GreenGen, built by China Huaneng Group, a giant state-owned electric utility, in collaboration with half a dozen other firms, various branches of the Chinese government, and, importantly, Peabody Energy, a Missouri firm that is the world’s biggest private coal company.

By Western standards, GreenGen is a secretive place; weeks of repeated requests for interviews and a tour met with no reply. When I visited anyway, guards at the site not only refused admittance but wouldn’t even confirm its name. As I drove away from the entrance, a window blind cracked open; through the slats, an eye surveyed my departure. The silence, in my view, is foolish. GreenGen is a billion-dollar facility that extracts the carbon dioxide from a coal-fired power plant and, ultimately, will channel it into an underground storage area many miles away. Part of a coming wave of such carbon-eating facilities, it may be China’s—and possibly the planet’s—single most consequential effort to fight climate change.

Because most Americans rarely see coal, they tend to picture it as a relic of the 19th century, black stuff piled up in Victorian alleys. In fact, a lump of coal is a thoroughly ubiquitous 21st-century artifact, as much an emblem of our time as the iPhone. Today coal produces more than 40 percent of the world’s electricity, a foundation of modern life. And that percentage is going up: In the past decade, coal added more to the global energy supply than any other source.

Nowhere is the preeminence of coal more apparent than in the planet’s fastest-growing, most populous region: Asia, especially China. In the past few decades, China has lifted several hundred million people out of destitution—arguably history’s biggest, fastest rise in human well-being. That advance couldn’t have happened without industrialization, and that industrialization couldn’t have happened without coal. More than three-quarters of China’s electricity comes from coal, including the power for the giant electronic plants where iPhones are assembled. More coal goes to heating millions of homes, to smelting steel (China produces nearly half the world’s steel), and to baking limestone to make cement (China provides almost half the world’s cement). In its frantic quest to develop, China burns almost as much coal as the rest of the world put together—a fact that makes climatologists shudder.

FOLLOW THE LINK FOR THE FULL REPORT – JR

https://www.wired.com/2014/03/clean-coal/

Live Stream: State of the Union Address 2018

2018 State of the Union Address

President Trump delivers his first State of the Union address, followed by the Democratic response from Representative Joe Kennedy III, as well as viewer calls and reaction from lawmakers.

FOLLOW THE LINK FOR THE FULL REPORT – JR

https://www.c-span.org/video/?439496-1/president-trump-delivers-state-union-address

Hamas founder dies after ‘accidentally’ shooting himself

A senior member of the Hamas terrorist organization has died, a Hamas spokesman said Tuesday, three weeks after he suffered what the terror organization claimed was an accidental self-inflicted gunshot wound in the head.

On January 9th, Fawzy Barhoum, spokesman for the Gaza-based Islamist terror group, said that Imad al-Alami, one of the movement’s most senior officials, was critically wounded when his personal firearm accidentally discharged.

FOLLOW THE LINK FOR THE FULL REPORT – JR

http://www.israelnationalnews.com/News/News.aspx/241335

Surge in oil price could derail global economy

JP Morgan and Barclays have both raised their forecasts for the oil price over the next year, and Morgan Stanley analysts warn it poses “upside risks” to inflation forecasts, as higher oil prices typically lead to higher energy and fuel costs which feed through into higher prices for other goods and services.

Rising inflation is seen as a key risk to economic growth in part because it could force central banks to hike interest rates more quickly, putting the brakes on business and household spending, and on stock markets.

FOLLOW THE LINK FOR THE FULL REPORT – JR

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/business/2018/01/29/surge-oil-price-could-derail-global-economy/